Court Deposition

court deposition
The court reporter tries to transcribe accurately what everyone says. If you or anyone else in the room speaks too quickly, this can be difficult.

Speaking in measured tones makes the court reporter’s job easier, and makes it more likely that the transcript of the deposition will be more accurate. In addition, speaking more slowly than usual can help you to formulate your words more completely and thoughtfully.

The words you say in a deposition and the construction of those words are important because they may be quoted in a later trial. You should use proper grammar, phraseology and facts when you speak in a deposition. The pace at which you speak in a deposition will not be heard in a court of law, unless the deposition happens to be videotaped. sometimes, your sphere of expertise has to refer to acronyms or proper names.

Whenever you use an uncommon word, you can help the court reporter by spelling it. It is also important to use simple “Yes” or “No” responses, rather than just shaking or nodding your head. While the court reporter listens to what you say, he or she cannot easily determine what your head movements mean.

Finally, do not speak while someone else is speaking. Hearing two voices speaking at the same time is challenging for anyone to understand. When you first enter the room, give your business card to the court reporter to help with the spelling of your name, as well as the address to which the copy of the transcript can be sent for your review.

By and large, court reporters edit their reports before submitting them for your review. They accurate for grammar and spelling, but cannot accurate technical misunderstandings regarding your content. That is your job. Remember the court reporter’s typed record is a legal document. It assumes even more legal import when you sign that the transcript is a valid reflection of what you said during the deposition.

It is not over until all the attorneys in the room agree that it is over. They have to tell the court reporter that they are now “off the record.” You cannot relax until that moment. occasionally you may hear an attorney say “that’s all I have;” you might think that the deposition is over at that point. It rarely is. Any of the other attorneys in the room can still ask extra questions. Even the lawyer who said he had no more questions can come back and ask you more, so do not take that proverbial deep breath and relax until the process itself is “off the record” and the deposition officially ends.

Depending on the urgency of the case, the attorneys may press the court reporter for immediate copies of the transcript. They may even ask for an electronic ‘raw’ copy of the deposition. The term “raw” refers to a copy of exactly what the court reporter has typed during the deposition day or days. After the deposition ends, read the transcript that is sent to you and submit any corrections, which will be incorporated as part of the final confirmed transcript. You may not change any details of opinions; only proper any obvious misunderstandings of the words you spoke during the deposition.

If the court reporter thinks he heard something, and you know you did not say the words recorded, you have to catch that. Otherwise, if it is a particularly important phrase regarding your work, you will have allowed a conflict to remain in the record and you will surely have to explain that conflict later at a trial.

Do not put yourself in that possibly embarrassing predicament. Spend the necessary time to reread your own transcript and edit any errors before they are cast in stone.

Some ill-advised attorneys will attempt to simplify matters by waiving your right to read, review, and accurate any errors in the deposition transcript. It’s your neck and reputation that’s on the line here. Do not permit this waiving. Insist on reading through the transcript. It’s not a perfect procedure; there are almost always errors to find.

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1844 Document/Deposition: Superior Court - Fairfield, Connecticut CT


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How to Give a Good Deposition and Testify Well in Court (DVD, 2006)


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1954 Press Photo Paul Reynaud Makes Deposition at Reuilly Military Court


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Clinicians in Court: A Guide to Subpoenas, Depositions, Testifying, and Everything Else You Need to Know


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Mental health and human service professionals are often called on to give evidence or expert testimony in a range of circumstances, including family law and child welfare trials, mental health hearings, malpractice lawsuits, criminal trials, government hearings, and private arbitration. Interacting with the legal system poses many potential challenges, but adequate preparation and a basic understa…

Clinicians in Court, Second Edition: A Guide to Subpoenas, Depositions, Testifying, and Everything Else You Need to Know


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Interacting with the legal system can be stressful and intimidating for mental health professionals. This trusted book provides user-friendly strategies to help clinicians prepare for testimony in court and other legal proceedings. Using vivid case scenarios, the author explains legal terms and offers practical suggestions for avoiding pitfalls and managing ethical dilemmas. Clear guidelines are p…

The Court Reporter's Reference of Commonly Used Words and Phrases


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The purpose of The Court Reporter’s Reference of Commonly Used Words and Phrases is to identify commonly used words and phrases, so that they may be added to your court reporting or realtime dictionary. Part I covers the most commonly used words and phrases found in books, magazines, and newspapers as well as words spoken on TV shows. The 5,000 most frequently used words and 200 commonly used phra…

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How to Give a Good Deposition and Testify Well in Court


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Giving a deposition or testifying at a trial can be a really painful and costly experience if you aren’t well prepared. “How To Give A Good Deposition And Testify Well In Court” is a practical, must-have DVD for preparing quickly and effectively for deposition and trial. It will give you the skills you need to be successful whether giving a deposition or testifying in court. Utilizing proven psy…

Court Reporting Schools

court reporting schools
Does anyone know of a credible court reporting school in California?

Hmmmm … what part of California is? I in north and there are some good schools. One is Sacramento Argonaut, which is a good school and has a very high pass rate not to mention it is only $ 600 year, including books, etc. Actually, is funded through the school district and it is so affordable. There are also other college Bryan school located in River Gold, which also have an excellent program, but enrollment is approximately $ 10,000 per year because it is a private school. Good luck to you and feel free to an email with any further questions!


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In a time of upheaval for journalism, local news is flourishing. People want to know about the chemical spill on the highway, the kidnapping trial in district court, the cuts in the school budget. News organizations have a constant need for both professional and citizen journalists who can report those stories accurately and interestingly. In the latest installment of the Field Guide,/i> series, F…

Court Reporter's and CART Services Handbook (4th Edition)


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This practical, real-world guide serves as a complete “how to” reference on the different aspects of court reporting. It uses easy-to-understand language to introduce both the basic and advanced concepts of court reporting across a wide range of court and legal procedures. The book is packed with general forms, sample written knowledge tests, and review questions designed to give learners an…

Court Reporters & Stress : How to Find the Time to Live


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Review by NCRA, Journal of Court Reporting, Editor, Ben Bogner.”If we had doubts that stress was a subject of interest to our readersand members, those would have been erased when we received the resultsof Dr. Barnett Harsh’s survey.  Dr. Barnett’s interest in our profession comes froma series of personal exposures to it.  She has been regarded as the “leading authority”in the court reporting fi…

Court Stenographer

court stenographer

As technology changes so does the court filing professional reports. A growing trend in courts across the country is the use of real time rather than traditional transcription. As elsewhere, reporters Tennessee court has to keep pace with increased demand.

Historically, Tennessee court reporters kept records of court proceedings using stenographic techniques. In order to keep up with the fast pace of the conversation that uses sequences Shorthand command.

The invention of stenographic machines made their job easier. Using a special keyboard that could record symbols that represented phonetic sounds, allowing them to enter unfamiliar words, even as fast as is spoken. Variations of these teams are still in use today.

The output from a stenographic machine is a nonsense to people who are not court reporters. Often a journalist can not read the output of another, as each person adopts an individual system of abbreviations and shortcuts to keep up. Part of the duties of court reporters went to Tennessee transcribe these confusing symbols into clear transcripts that could provide the lawyers, judge, or other interested parties.

The captioning of television programs for the deaf has its roots in Tennessee. The First National Conference on Television for disabled people hearing was held in Nashville in 1971 to discuss technology subtitles.

The captioning system struggled in the 1970s but eventually the first captioned television program was broadcast by the National Institute of subtitles (NCI) on March 16, 1980. At first captioning was limited to programs pre-recorded, leaving plenty of time studies to create the subtitles. However, the hearing impaired community demanded access to live programs also and in 1982 the NCI developed real-time captioning.

To meet the demand for captioning live events, reporters cut across the country were recruited and many court reporters Tennessee left the courtroom to work in television stations.

Over time, court systems saw the advantage of real-time access to trial transcripts. The judge and lawyers do not can only review the transcript during the session, but you can add your own notes to the proceedings.

It allows hard of hearing litigants to participate fully in their own court proceedings without the use of an interpreter. Deaf jurors get as much information as their hearing counterparts. This change owes much to a new software that allows the output of a stenographic court reporter to be immediately translated into English in clear text.

Tennessee court reporters have had to adapt to these new demands, implementing this new transcription software and customize to their unique stenographic techniques. They also have to increase your speed, as court reporters have to take by testimony at 180 words per minute while a real-time reporter must be able to operate 225 words per minute. This new presentation of real-time reporting offers transcription services to a recording device never could and offered to judges and lawyers access to more information than I had before.

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STENOGRAPH STENTURA 400 COURT REPORTING MACHINE


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In offering this revised and enlarged SECOND EDITION the author hopes that it may meet a continuance of the same favor with which its predecessor has been received. This volume occupies a gap hitherto practically unfilled in commercial and higher stenography. It answers a felt human want as well as a commercial demand. After an exhaustive investigation the author finds that this is the first book …

Court Reporters & Stress : How to Find the Time to Live


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Review by NCRA, Journal of Court Reporting, Editor, Ben Bogner.”If we had doubts that stress was a subject of interest to our readersand members, those would have been erased when we received the resultsof Dr. Barnett Harsh’s survey.  Dr. Barnett’s interest in our profession comes froma series of personal exposures to it.  She has been regarded as the “leading authority”in the court reporting fi…

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Described by some as one of the last great jobs in law enforcement, the NYS Court Officer position has no age limitation. The number of candidates taking the exam has increased dramatically in recent years, reflecting the desirablilty of the profession. In order to succeed against this increased competition, the candidate must be prepared to tackle the unique question types found on the exam. Th…







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